Ta Prohm Temple

Perhaps most people know the very famous temple of Angkor Wat located near Siem Reap in Cambodia.  What most people don’t know is that Angkor Wat is just one of many temple complexes in that area.  

The first temple I visited in the region was Ta Prohm.  

I actually enjoyed exploring this temple more than I did later exploring Ankor Wat, although the latter had more wow factor from afar, set-up like the Taj Mahal in how you appreciate the view of it from it’s approach.

I have already talked about the devastation of the Khmer rouge on recent Cambodian life. The reality of landmines comes to life around Siem Reap with panhandlers missing limbs and those who have figured out how to make an income despite their disabilities.  

Click on the second image below to hear this band playing inside the entrance of this temple complex.

 

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These temples were more towns than temple.  The outer wall of this one was 1 km by 650 m.   

Ta Prohm was one of the first temples in a massive program of construction and public works started in 1186 by Jayavarman VII.

When I say it was more of a town I mean this.  According to Wikipedia this temple was home to more than 12,500 people.  The surrounding villages that provided the support services and supplies for this walled city of sorts amounted to 64 times that.  That’s quite a ratio, 1:64, or 800,000 villagers behind the scenes.

This particular temple complex is iconic for its trees, growing through and on and amongst the structures.

Click on the image below to see a video.

 I feel like videos bring you closer to the site than do photos.

When standing far back it is not apparent the level of detail of construction. 

Of course most of the details have been obscured by 800 years of wear.  But see here some great examples.

As with all of these complexes,  after the fall of the Khmer empire in the 17th century these places were basically lost for hundreds of years.  When the temples of Angkor were finally given attention again in the 21st-century, it was decided that much of this one would be left remaining in the state as it had merged with the jungle.  Of course work has been done to stabilize and permit access.  

Ta Prohm was added to the UNESCO world heritage list in 1992.  In this photo you can see the lighter colored pieces are newly created.    So this structure would have been reassembled from a collapsed structure.  

Despite learning that this complex was being left more as it had been found, I saw more reconstruction happening here then at any other temple complex today. (I visited four today, which was a lot for me to take in.).  It has become one of the most visited temples.

The structures have been fortified as needed for safe explorations within.

Rubble of collapsed structures can be seen everywhere, and signs showing which way you should allow yourself to wander.

Click on the images below for videos of repair and piles of rubble yet to be put to their right order.

I was surprised by the degree to which we could explore.

Click on the video below to see more of this magical landscape .  You may recognize it from a movie 

 

The trees were incredible ..  I read that the most prominent are the silk cotton tree, the strangler fig tree,  and the gold apple tree.

The film that had scenes here was called “Tomb Raider” and starred Angelina Joliie.

At this time it was only about 9 o’clock in the morning, so I was not yet melting.  It was already about 32°C at that time, but the sun was not yet burning hot.

Despite the heat, it is polite and respectful not to show your legs at the temple complexes.  So here I wear a light pant sold at the local stores for that purpose.

I took this tour guides picture because he came from my favorite city in Japan.  I lived for two years in the city of Matsuyama, the main city of Ehime Prefecture. Ehime Shinbun is the provincial newspaper.

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Thank you for Joining my visit to Ta Prohm in Cambodia.  I hope you will join with me visiting more of these temple complexes in upcoming posts.  

Cheers!

Darren

 

We are laughing about how much she is cheating me for this ballcap, in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Despite being pressured by my hotel to accept (and pay too much for) a tour of Angkor Wat by their tuktuk driver from 7 AM on my first day, instead I slept in and explored the town.  I was overtired and anyway it was easy to sleep late due to something that my room was lacking.  The room I prepaid for had a broken air conditioner so I was downgraded into a room where it worked.  This was after considerable effort on my part.  On the top floor, the room was hotter than the outdoors.  (Low of 30C with usual highs of 39C outside)

My new room had no window and no television, making it basically a cave.   Without the character of a cave.

 

I bet they don’t even know this is a famous person’s hairdo on their salon sign.  They probably just took a foreign person’s hairstyle off the Internet.

I left my hotel not knowing what I would do today in particular,  just I was tired and overheated.  My first stop became a massage for 60 minutes, I decided to try the local Kmer massage.  Once was enough for that.  There is perhaps reason why it is not world-famous. (Later I will have other fantastic massages here, just not that type.)

I let myself be coaxed in to a restaurant for lunch where I paid 10 times the average wage for a Cambodian according to Wikipedia, for this salad and drink.  ($10US)

. There were two customers in this large restaurant during lunchtime, me and one other foreigner.  That’s always a good sign.  LOL.

This always boggles my mind.  An otherwise well designed restaurant.  Here notice the bathroom door is propped open, often the case for a men’s room.  Except that the mirrors are strategically placed so those outside can see who is using the urinals.  

I was feeling grumpy this day.  

Click on the image below to view the video of me being grumpy in the market.

In my travels this is often a conundrum for me.  To give or not to give, what is actually better?  This Cambodian charity is requesting we not give and keep their children on the streets.  I had heard about this quandry in India.  A child would encounter a foreigner and earn too much money in one day.  The parent would decide their income potential was too good to let them go back to school.  And the cycle of poverty continues.

Every tuk-tuk I countered offered to take me somewhere.  Even though I was not going anywhere in particular, I finally accepted.  I had a good feeling about this young man

Click on the video below.

We agreed on six dollars an hour for random wanderings.  This is a very good amount for him yet affordable enough for me.  Yet you can hire a tuk tuk for $12 for the entire day.

If you look closely enough you can see bats in this tree.  In the country people will throw stones and then eat them my driver told me. Most things are considered fair game for eating in Cambodia.

If you squint your eyes, this lion might remind you of something else.  

We are laughing about how much she is cheating me on this ball cap.  Really, we are.

I want you to guess what this is.  I see them all over and it wasn’t what I thought it was.  Sometimes they are all Coke bottles but filled with this other colored liquid.  So I thought maybe it was that tea that every restaurant gives you instead of water.

This is a gas station.  Motor cycles and tuk tuks can easily measure how much gas they used to fuel up by half litre bottles.

I have been giving my driver lots of instructions that I would like to see more local areas.  We we didn’t start out great as he at first tried to take me shopping to all the large souvenir shops, the free-standing tourist traps designed to attract guides with their busloads of clients to earn kickbacks.  This would hugely increase his income if I bought anything at these very large tourist centers.  In fact he explained to me that if I could look for 10 minutes they would give him a vodka and Coke.  If I wanted my driver to be drinking vodka I would buy him vodka myself.  But I don’t

Looks like the sculptor of this elephant used some LSD

He told me monks live there.

On the most interesting part of the ride I did not feel comfortable taking photos.  And I didn’t.

My driver told me these are grave markers.

Click on the video below to see a sweet greeting.

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I think it’s cow.  I wanted our picture together but they were afraid of me.

Click on the video below to see the full view including this cow and 

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Me and my driver, Vichet

My Vietnam Adventure Begins in Saigon

This is my first blog posting that I’m attempting from my mobile phone. I’ve been having issues with my hands lately so I am using voice recognition, which is very cool. Unfortunately it’s different than writing, but it’s fine for the purposes of my blog.

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Sometimes it’s nice to not have to figure out how to get to your hotel on arrival.

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If I had forgotten Vietnam was a communist country I would’ve been reminded as I wandered down the streets by my hotel. This would’ve been hard to forget though, seeing as the arrival procedure with the visa process took more than 90 minutes and was quite far from streamlined.


The image above is a short clip of a New Years festival I stumbled upon my first day in Saigon. Click on the image to view the video.

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Most of the shops, restaurants, and services in my neighbourhood were closed for the week for New Years. (Vietnam New Near same as Chinese New Year.) I was happy to find this little shop to get my mobile phone operating!


Click on the video above to witness, as I did, all the closed businesses in the district as I explored on this Saturday, my first day in Saigon/Ho Chi Minh.

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This little street-side cafe I passed. In fact, the next day I ended-up eating there, it was all I could find open on Sunday and it was actually fine.

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The BBQ for the food stall was more than 10m away from the actual stall.

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Some pics in a lovely flower-themed park celebrating New Year.

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Along with many locals, I do need to use a mask here and there when wandering around this large city congested with heavy traffic. But, armed with my masks I will stay well!

(I finished this posting on my ipad, my phone app died and never came back, and it doesn’t post videos. Better luck to me next time!)

Stay tuned for more in Ho Chi Minh city, and lots of missing postings from the Philippines in upcoming weeks.

Cheers!

Darren