The Regency Spa Town of Cheltenham

Cheltenham

Cheltenham is another town that came into it’s own with the prosperity of having natural mineral waters. “Taking the waters” was highly fashionable by England’s elite and where mineral waters sprung high society soon followed. I heard on television that this asset was noticed by the pigeons before the humans. In 1716, pigeons were seen flocking to a water flow, drinking the salty liquid when someone thought to check-it-out. The rest is history.

Cheltenham’s spa success was dramatically moved forward when King George III visited with the Queen and Princesses in 1788, giving the spa town his very fashionable stamp of approval. If it’s good enough for the King. . . .

At the edge of the Cotswolds in the county of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham has a population of around 115 thousand. Today it is perhaps England’s most complete Recency town, and that is probably the main reason to visit as a tourist unless one is specifically attending one of the many festivals or events that are held here.

I set-off to this city from my stay in Warwick with a friend who joined me from Birmingham. I collected Barbara at Warwick Rail Station before driving us Southwest for about an hour through lovely countryside made slightly less friendly by the overcast skies and rain showers.

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Rain, rain go away.

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Cheltenham was home to the brilliant composer Gustav Holst. If you think you don’t know his music, you are probably mistaken. I do think most people would recognise at least part of his most famous works named after the planets. My favourite is Jupiter because I once played a trumpet part in it when attending music camp at R C S Netherwood, in Rothesay, New Brunswick.

These are photos inside his family home, now recreated as a museum.

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This was a maids room. Located either in the basement or the attic, they were the most sparse rooms of a home.

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This is a fantastic doll house.

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Flowers and fountain in downtown Cheltenham.

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This and the following photos show Recency Architecture.

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This style definitely reminds me of the housing surrounding Regent’s Park in London. I used to cycle past these homes that curved around the park on my way to work everyday in Mayfair.

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There is more definition going on at the backs of these structures.

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Cheltenham’s Town Hall. It also had a spa within at one time.

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“Look what you’re sitting on,” Barbara points out without even a touch of irony after I have joined her sitting on the side of a fountain honouring Holst.

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Like most lovely English towns and cities, I love the downtown pedestrianised zones.

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The Lovely English Countryside, Warwick to Royal Leamington Spa

Royal Leamington Spa

At Warwick’s Tourist Information centre I was very happy to come across pamphlets describing suggested walks from Warwick. Some suggest that walkers walk one direction and catch public transport to return. But with a bicycle, I can easily cover much more ground with time to spare for explorations at the other end.

“Do you know if I will be able to cycle the paths that are marked for walking?” I ask at the desk behind which three cheerful ladies are having playful banter with one another and with a visitor who was there before me. “As long as you can carry your bicycle up and down a few steps, I think you can.” “Fantastic. I’ll also take these please,” handing her some postcards to purchase.

The next morning I make my way to the River Avon, which runs through Warwick directly past Warwick Castle. I’m not sure why this isn’t Warwick Upon Avon instead of just Warwick. Downriver, the town of Stratford is Stratford Upon Avon. What decides whether a town becomes partially known by the river that runs through it, I wonder. Stoke Upon Trent.

After taking some lovely photos of Warwick Castle from a bridge over the Avon, I descend to the riverside path that at this point is within the lovely St. Nicholas Park. There is a boat hire shop nearly under the bridge where one can rent various types of paddle boats. This seems to be a dog park, lots of dogs are off-leash socializing with each other while little huddles of dog owners do the same. There is a group of ducks and swans that draw much interest from the water dogs in particular. I stop to watch for a moment and take some photos. “Are you waiting to see if he goes in?” a friendly dog owner calls over. She is trying to get her dog to come away from the birds, he’s darting about the water’s edge while the swans honk warnings at him.

I continue on. The path eventually makes way to grass, it seems a bit odd to cycle on grassy fields, but it is a public space alongside the river and people do. Stopped again to take another photo I encounter a woman coming from the other direction on her bicycle. She pauses. “It is so beautiful here!” I comment. “Isn’t it wonderful! I discovered these trails two years ago and I keep telling my friends that I cycle to work through beautiful country and they keep assuming I mean along the canal. No! I tell them, along the river!” It’s so true, using this route I feel completely in the country, there are even pastures where sheep graze along the river here. But in very near proximity, the streets are lined with homes and businesses. It’s like hidden countryside.

“I found this from these pamphlets from the Tourist Office on Jury Street,” I tell her, “you should pick-them-up because there are other trails as well. There’s one all the way from Warwick Castle to Kenilworth Castle. I might try that another day.” “Do you live here?” she asks. “No, this is just my second day here, I’m visiting from Canada.” “Well welcome to Warwick! I’ve got to continue to work, but it was lovely to meet you!”

A few more photo stops and detours later and I find myself cycling through a park, now in Royal Leamington Spa. I stop and take a photo of lawn bowlers, remembering fondly how my late Grandmother used to enjoy that sport near her home in Fredericton, New Brunswick. I never saw her play, but she’d tell me about her games. I went to university in Fredericton and usually spent Sundays visiting my Grandmother, who was my Mother’s Mother. She was a very strong woman, spent the last several decades of her life as a widow after Grandad died soon after his early retirement from a heart attack. He had a weakened heart from having suffered rheumatic fever as a young man.

Grandmother was one of the very early women to graduate university in the 1930’s with a Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics. My Mother followed in her footsteps taking the same degree from the same university.

I continue on and cycle about the city centre after leaving the park.

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Gorgeous views of Warwick Castle on the River Avon.

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More lovely views along the River Avon.

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Part of the riverside trail was on grassy fields.

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My folding bicycle stops to enjoy a quiet moment in nature.

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If it was any prettier I probably would have started crying.

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Lawn Bowling in Royal Leamington Spa. I suppose life could be worse.

Royal Leamington Spa was a small town called Lamintone of about 50 cottages in 1783. A salt-water spring was notes as early as 1480 and was found useful for curing meat and making bread.

Towards the end of the 18th Century, “taking the waters” became very fashionable as high society flocked to Bath and then to Leamington as well. Queen Victoria gave the town a charter, changing the name to Royal Leamington Spa.

By 1841, the town had grown from about 200 residents to over 12,000 in just over 50 years. The rapid growth and prosperity meant that much of the city is comprised of lovely Georgian style architecture which was fashionable at the time as the town did it’s best to emulate the glorious spa town of Bath.

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Queen Victoria stands in front of town hall carved in Italian marble, but it was King George who really put this town on it’s feet.

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I just thought the mail cart was cute. Non-Brits may agree?

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As one would imagine, spa towns do not tend to be ugly.

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After cycling and walking about the downtown and enjoying the lovely Jephson Gardens, I started my way back to Warrick, this time via the towpaths of the Grand Union Canal which extends all the way from Birmingham to London. Originally a series of differently-owned canals, it became the 137 mile long Grand Union in 1925.

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I went to Royal Leamington Spa mostly by the River Avon and returned by the Grand Union Canal.

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Photographing while cycling. Wow, I didn’t fall into the canal!

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<img src="https://personaltravelstories.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/20130526

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The Black Country town of Walsall

Visiting Walsall, near Birmingham, May 2013

When traveling, especially for as long as I am, it is a gift when a local extends their friendship with a personal invitation to see their town. So it was I ended-up visiting the unlikely destination of Walsall, essentially a suburb of Birmingham now but born in the days when such an idea was not conceivable.

Situated 35 minutes by train from New Street Station in Birmingham, the town of Walsall is a destination in it’s own right. “I was wondering if you might like to meet me in Walsall to visit the Art Gallery and Arboretum,” I received as a text from a sweet woman I have met at meet-ups twice before.

“It’s disgustin'” “It’s alright, cud be worse.” “There’s just nothing there.” Similar commendations from Brummies who have never been to Walsall as I heard from Southerners who have never been to Birmingham. “Have you been there?” “No.” Well then, your opinion must be very accurate I’m sure.

I take a photo of the approaching train comparing the sight with the trains that approached me in India. India has left such a strong impression on me, I still think of her often. (I think most Indians consider India a “she”.) The gleaming structure approaches the platform VERY slowly, leaving me holding my camera up to my face for much longer than I would have expected. So slow that it could easily stop very short if someone were to do something stupid, incredibly safe approach. “Quite a contrast to Indian trains,” I share with the girl beside me, “the ones I rode were not able to close their doors and people hung outside.” “That does sound quite different.” “People were jumping off the train before it even came to a stop,” I added.

From Nottingham, this girl with long, curly cranberry-blonde hair moved to Birmingham to do her PHD. I sit closely enough on the train as to be able to chat with her from across the aisle, I had hoped we could continue our discourse and she was happy to do so. Two other gentlemen join in the conversation. A student of the Birmingham Conservatoire is going to Walsall to try-out the pipe organ at Walsall’s Town Hall before being part of a group performance there tomorrow. He has never been to Walsall. Another gentleman sitting behind me overhears me explain how it is that I come to be where I am today, on a train from Birmingham to Walsall. Sometime after becoming single I sold my business and my home and now completely untied I am traveling the world. “I’m trying to start a development business,” he starts, “oh no, this is my stop.” “Look-up Launch48,” I tell him, “It could be useful to you, it’s a weekend conference where people form groups to brainstorm and set-up businesses in the course of 48 hours. It could be a really good start for you. . . .” and he is away.

The lovely PHD student exits where the University of Birmingham has a suburban campus and the young organist and I chat until the end. “What are you playing tomorrow?” “Something nasty, I really don’t like it.” He tells me what it’s called but I don’t recognise it. I guess something modern. For a pipe organ. One doesn’t really think of modern and pipe organ together, but I suppose why not. “How did you choose it?” “Oh, I had no choice, they told me what I have to play.”

We exited the station onto the high street 20 minutes early. After he gets directions to the Town Hall from a friendly local we part ways. There is more than one exit and we did not decide where to meet because texting makes one lazy that way. “Where are u?” “I’m at . . .” “Okay, walk to your left see you in a minute.” That’s what usually happens.

“I’m here, where should we meet?”
“Unable to send.”
“Unable to send.”
“Unable to send.”

I enter the Carphone Warehouse located right at the exit where I am standing. I don’t have any signal but I know I have credit on this pay-as-you-go phone that I got from ee. “Do you work with T-Mobile?” I ask. “We can top-up T-Mobile.” “My phone isn’t working, can you take a look?” An Indian woman accepts my phone, “You have no connection.” She then goes through the very highly-technical process of removing the battery and SIM card, replacing, and repowering the phone. “It’s back now, I don’t know why it disappeared. Do you want me to check your balance?” “Sure.” She presses some buttons and an automated voice tells us, “You – have – 8 – pounds – 68 – pence. For – more – information – press – 1. To – hang – up – press – 2” or something like that.

“I might as well top-up, can you add £20?” “Certainly, Sir.” “You should take your phone to ee if you continue to have problems, they are just down the high street, just turn right after you go out.”

“Thanks very much.” “You’re very welcome, Sir.”

Outside I run into Clare who is climbing the steps towards the entrance of the Shopping Arcade in which the station is located. “Hi Ya!”

Well that was good, I guess I must have come to the most obvious spot. “Shall we go right to the gallery?” she asks. “Absolutely.”

I really like pedestrian high streets in Great Britain. People walking and lingering and meeting-up on lovely cobbled spaces without the noise and intrusion of vehicular traffic. I cannot understand why these areas are so rare in North America, would it kill traffic to close off one central street to cars? Imagine the feeling in Toronto if Yonge Street was a long pedestrian park, still lined with the streets and shops, but closed to vehicles. Places to walk and sit and relax, all on lovely paving stones with the occasional sculpture, statue, and arrangements of flower gardens and shrubbery. Of course, there would need to be infrastructure on either side of the street to allow it, and at some intersections traffic would need to cross as it does here. It may be impossible for most of our cities as they are now, but imagine the warm and pleasant feeling it would create and does create throughout many cities of Europe and many places in the world. Birmingham has a great pedestrian zone. And so does Walsall.

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The rain was really coming down as we walked along Walsall’s pedestrianized high street, but it was still a lovely time.

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The New Art Gallery Walsall.

We enter the New Art Gallery Walsall which sits at the top end of high street. A tall, modern structure it stands proudly in front of of a canal pool. Completed in 1999, the gallery was designed via an international competition and has become the largest building in the UK that was designed by a British architect under 40.

“What a pretty puppy!” Clare exclaims when I remove my scarf. I’m wearing one of those horrendous but fun and cheerful t-shirts that have life-like oversized animal faces on them. It’s hard to be looked at too seriously when wearing one of those. I feel like I must look approachable with such a silly shirt, will people judge me as someone who doesn’t take himself too seriously, or will they just assume poor taste? I find that I get both reactions.

“Is it a girl or a boy puppy?” I hadn’t thought of this. Spot decision, “He’s a boy!” “What’s his name?” I look down to my chest in consideration. “He needs a name,” she informs me. His eyes, enormous from the enlarged reproduction, look very bright. “Sparkles,” I suggest. “Sparkle Pop!” Clare corrects. “Ahhh, cute little Sparkle Pop! Are you ready to see some pretty pictures?” she asks as we exit the lift to start the exhibition from the top, 4th floor.

David Rowan’s display of photographs will be shown here until July 21st, 2013. Although I would not call his collection, Pacha Kuti Ten, pretty, they are intriguing and I relate to them. I would want to take these kinds of photos myself were I a photographer. He is showing us the bowels of Birmingham. The underground facilities that are rarely seen by the public. I find this kind of thing fascinating. Below this lovely paving stone walkway with trees and flowers, beyond your view, is this dark sewer tunnel system. Is this former coal mine. Is this underground vault. Is this hidden canal.

The Tenth Pacha Kuti is an Inca prediction of apocalypse and translates as being when the world turns upside down. In this collection, Rowan shows us the subterranean world that lurks below us, just out of view as we go about our lives in Birmingham. To me, the message feels sort of like: your world does exist, but at the same time this also exists.

You can see a few of these images by clicking on the following link.

http://www.davidrowan.org/work/pacha-kuti-ten/

One level down we are greeted by a sculpture by Patricia Piccinini. This looks like a deformed animal made out of chicken flesh wearing a hat and training hair. “It’s not pretty!” Clare screams. It is very, very not pretty. Clearly it is not supposed to be. You really must click on this link to see the sculpture I’m referring to.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=patricia+piccinini&client=safari&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=XeyUUY_nCcXChAfL-oD4Bw&ved=0CDgQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=672#biv=i%7C46%3Bd%7C5PHAhK6oH8-UEM%3A

Her other sculpture present is of a “sphinx”, also looks like a chicken-flesh blob. Her work is unique, interesting. I would recommend clicking on this link to see some more of it, I have never seen anything like it myself. (If the link doesn’t work, just Google Patricia Piccinini, this is a link to the Google Images.)

https://www.google.ca/search?q=patricia+piccinini&client=safari&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=XeyUUY_nCcXChAfL-oD4Bw&ved=0CDgQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=672

Hanging on the wall in the same gallery are life-sized paintings of bulls by Mark Fairington.

http://www.markfairnington.com/page26.htm

These are part of the exhibition, “Nature of the Beast” which is on until June 30, 2013.

An installation piece by Tessa Farmer, a Birmingham-born artist who now resides in London, involves mostly insect taxidermy. Ants of various sizes on the open floor consuming a dead snake. Very creepy. A food chain of shell fish to insects. Hundreds of flying wasps, very unsettling to stand at, all dangling from invisible thread within reaching distance. Her piece de resistance, she has made little people using insect body parts.

Definitely worth a look by clicking on this link. If the link doesn’t work, just Google Tessa Farmer and you will see lots of images.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=tessa+farmer&client=safari&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=efCUUYyDPIeK7Ab6-YDgAQ&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=672

Polly Morgan creates very disturbing works with her taxidermy. But I like it. “It’s creepy! I want to touch it!” says a distressed Clare, who now realises that she has not brought me to Walsall to see some pretty art. It is all fantastically interesting though. Pretty pictures can only capture my attention for so long.

A small fox intertangled and pierced by octopus tentacles, a tentacle goes in one ear and out the other, a tentacle protrudes from an eye socket. Some taxidermed birds are involved as well.

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View more of Polly Morgan’s work by Googling her name.

This very cool video shows the amount of work that it takes to put-up such an exhibit. Less than 2 minutes, take a look, it’s interesting in a general museum way.

http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=Nonk2-KWkkQ&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DNonk2-KWkkQ

Perhaps the main exhibit was anatomy works by Damien Hirst. A photo of him when he was 16 provides a good introduction. At that time he used to visit the anatomy department at Leeds University where he worked on anatomical drawings. This photo is of a happy, young, smiling Damien with his face posed nearly touching the severed head of a cadaver that sits on a table. It is astonishing to behold. I don’t want to violate copyright, so again here is a link to the photo rather than the actual image:

http://www.damienhirst.com/with-dead-head

Overall I was very impressed with the New Art Gallery Walsall. If you live in Birmingham or somewhere nearby, it is definitely worth a visit.

http://www.thenewartgallerywalsall.org.uk/

Following our artistic appreciation we stop for lunch at the Costa location within the gallery. It’s a nice open space with windows onto the canal pool.

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A view looking out the window of the Art Gallery.

Outside we walk down the high street and past a statue of Dorothy Wyndlow Pattison who was a hard-working and highly respected nurse in Walsall. When she died in 1878 she became the first woman in the country to have a statue commemorating her who wasn’t a member of the Royal Family.

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Near Pattison’s statue stands a more modern sculpture of a Hippo (See photo of me riding it.) and another of a head with tools of the trade in his/her very ample hair, or falling towards them, I’m not sure. This is not one of my favourite statues.

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Continuing our tour of Walsall we walk past the lovely Town Hall, a library and another museum, as we make our way to the Walsall Arboretum. We enter the park through the gates of a lovely brick structure that sits across from the school where Clare attended with all girls. She had earlier recognised her former uniform on a group of grade 7 girls who were drafting some of the sights in the animal exhibits in the museum as we wandered about.

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Walsall’s Town Hall.

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The entry gate to Walsall’s Arboretum.

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Fortunately, today’s rains had completely abated by the time we were walking about. Colours really come out just after rain too.

The arboretum is a gorgeous park surrounding a boating lake. Occupying 80 acres, it includes more than 200 species of tree and shrub. It also has a play grounds, a bowling green, a playhouse, and a children’s park. We enjoyed walking the circumference where we chatted and met some friendly dogs. And dog owners.

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When one thinks of Walsall, one thinks of the lovely central boating lake surrounded by trees, flowers, and fields where one can take a country walk very near to downtown.

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Okay, perhaps one doesn’t, but I do.

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It’s a perfect picnic spot also.

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This is not a headless swan, he/she was grooming and each time his/her head came up I missed it.

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“Ma-ma, are you able to have guests?” Clare asks into her mobile phone. “You could make us a nice cup of tea?” Clare’s parents live nearby the arboretum. Wandering in their direction we meet a wonderful pit bull. Snoopy has a limp. Turns out that 3 years ago he was running full-throttle with a stick in his mouth. He’s a very heavy dog and when the stick suddenly caught on the ground it went right into him through the back of this mouth. Sounds like it was touch-and-go with some major surgeries and they needed to borrow a leg muscle as part of the reconstruction. Poor little guy. He’s as happy as could possibly be now though, he loves his cuddles!

We greet a welcoming retired school teacher upon entering Clare’s home. Clare’s Mum taught young ones, primary school, before keeping herself active with various different activities. Today she had been shopping in Birmingham, bought some clothes. “Don’t tell Father,” she jokes, kind-of, to Clare. She seems young for her age, the high activity of being in the classroom every day has done her well. Running around with children must be better than sitting behind a computer all day when it comes to one’s well-being. “One had to be high energy,” she offers as way of explanation. So true.

Clare’s Dad returns from playing snooker and after some friendly banter retires somewhere to listen to organ music. “He usually plays it much louder, ” Clare tells me. “Guess what Darren’s new name is,” Clare tells them, “Blossom.” Yes, she has decided this to be my appropriate nickname while we were sauntering through the park where there were lots of apple and cherry blossoms. Mostly it was in response to me telling her that in Scotland some of the girls at the office called me “Petal”. The guys called me “Daz” or “Dazzer” (pronounced da-zah).

Our teas long gone Clare walks me back to the station to catch my train back to Birmingham. A lovely day.

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